Capturing the spirit of Tallahassee and creating an iconic sense of place in the downtown region.

In response to a Request for Proposals (RFP) issued by the Tallahassee Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA) in August 2016, national developer North American Properties (NAP) — in partnership with Uptown Rental Properties and other local and national entities — has proposed a $158-million mixed-use development on East Gaines Street, north of Cascades Park.

 

Project components being explored include mid-rise residential, retail, office, restaurant and hotel space built to maximize views of the park and the Capitol building, along with pedestrian-friendly paths to connect the development to downtown. At the heart of the proposed development is “Festival Street,” a main corridor that can be closed off to support pedestrian-only events, food trucks, pop-up retail and outdoor entertainment. The preliminary master plan also features a designated community arts and cultural space to complement the events and activities that occur in the park. It is important to note that project plans will go through several iterations as NAP and its local partners determine what is economically and logistically feasible to build.

NAP and its local and national partners are working with local government through a public process to address community priorities and determine the firm and final vision for the project. For example, a Community Historical User Group of educators, preservationists, and civil rights and community leaders has been created to work with NAP to explore the historical significance of the project area and help cast a vision for how to best commemorate the stories it holds through a public plaza. Depending on the final plans and agreements with the CRA and the City, construction could begin as early as December 2017, with the first phase potentially opening in the summer of 2019. Though still in the preliminary stages of the process, NAP is committed to sharing information with the community as the project progresses.

- Common Questions -

  • 1. Where will the development be located?

    The redevelopment project will take place on the Firestone and Bloxham Annex properties – two blocks totaling approximately 5 acres on East Gaines Street between South Calhoun Street and South Meridian Street, to the north of Cascades Park.

  • 2. How will this project benefit the community?

    This is an unprecedented project in Tallahassee that leverages the public investment in Cascades Park to perpetuate a high quality of life in the downtown region. Key community benefits include:

    • Broadening the allure of Cascades Park by offering a vibrant, authentic experience of Tallahassee that appeals to a diverse population and instills a sense of pride in residents and visitors alike
    • Generating significant economic impacts, including approximately $1.29 million in new tax revenue (as estimated by the CRA staff) in the first year after the development has been completed, and the creation of hundreds of temporary and ongoing local jobs
    • Strengthening Tallahassee’s appeal among young professionals and the creative class to help reduce the area’s loss of young professionals
    • Highlighting and commemorating the area’s rich history
    • Improving walkability through pedestrian-friendly pathways that connect the development to downtown and afford future residents the opportunity to walk or bike to work at downtown office buildings
    • Elevating the experience for families that may visit Cascades on evenings and weekends
  • 3. How will this project impact the local economy?

    According to CRA staff, once completed, the new development as currently proposed will generate an estimated $1.29 million in new tax revenue in the first year alone. An economic analysis was commissioned by OEV and conducted by Dr. Julie Harrington, director of Center for Economic Forecasting and Analysis at Florida State University. According to the study, the construction impacts of the project will result in nearly $300 million in economic output and more than 2,200 jobs. The study also showed that the project will create nearly 700 permanent jobs and an ongoing annual economic output of more than $64 million, making this one of the region’s largest economic development projects in recent history.

    The full study can be viewed here.

  • 4. How is the project being paid for?

    North American Properties will invest approximately $158 million in the redevelopment project, pending any changes that are made to the project design during negotiations with local government. The CRA has asked NAP to incorporate public spaces into the development, including public parking, sidewalks, streetscapes, amphitheater support facilities, public gathering spots and historical displays, among other items. When considered within the broader project, these public components will contribute to the creation of a significant public asset for the community that increases the local tax base, generates nearly 700 permanent jobs, attracts new residents and visitors, contributes to the goal of an 18-hour downtown, generates more than $64 million in ongoing annual economic output and spurs additional development in the area. The CRA has asked NAP to determine the economic value of the requested public assets and the level of public investment that will be required by local government to support the initiative. NAP is currently evaluating that request and expects to present an estimate to the CRA board later this summer.

  • 5. What is the project timeline?

    Note: The following timeline is subject to change. NAP remains committed to working with local government to keep the community informed over the duration of the project.

    January-March 2017 – Negotiation of Purchase and Sale Agreement (PSA):

    On Jan. 26, 2017, following a public procurement process, the CRA board voted to negotiate a Purchase and Sale Agreement (PSA) with NAP for the redevelopment of the Firestone and Bloxham Annex parcels. On March 23, 2017, the CRA board approved the terms of the PSA and agreed to sell the parcels to NAP at a price of $4.28 million.


    April-September 2017 – Investigation Period:

    NAP will invest in extensive studies to develop a more detailed and accurate understanding of the cost and marketability of the proposed development. Tasks to be completed during this investigative period include:

    Physical, Design and Cost Review:

    • ALTA (American Land Title Association) survey
    • Complete soils investigation including over 68 soil borings to a depth of 40 – 50 feet to design the foundations and subterranean garages
    • Phase One ESA (Environmental Site Assessment), including lead paint and asbestos
    • Phase Two ESA
    • Structural analysis of the existing buildings including the Firestone and Bloxham Annex Buildings
    • Tree survey of each tree and procurement of an arborist’s opinion of each large live oak
    • Complete impact fee analysis including transportation, utility and schools
    • Concurrency evaluation including traffic studies and utility analysis
    • Energy audit including gas and electric
    • Stormwater analysis including a basin study of the Cascades Park facility
    • Interlocal agreement for parking facilities with the State of Florida
    • Civil engineering design and opinion of cost
    • Architectural schematic designs including opinion of cost
    • Negotiations with the City of Tallahassee for the Amphitheater support facilities as required by the original Request for Proposals (RFP)
    • Title review, including the quiet title action
    • PUD (Planned Unit Development) guideline review and preparation of the PUD document
    • Parking analysis for the inclusion of public parking
    • Offsite improvement plan including sidewalks, intersections and utilities
    • Negotiations with the Office of Economic Vitality
    • Investigation into applicable New Market Tax credit programs

    Market Review:

    • Feasibility study including occupancy and average daily rate projects for the hotel component
    • Market analysis for the residential component including unit mix, required amenities and rental rates
    • Office market rate and occupancy study
    • Retail restaurant negotiations
    • Amenity negotiations including public open space

    October 2017-March 2018 – Permit Period:

    Should all parties agree to proceed following the Investigation Period, NAP and CRA will work together to obtain development approvals for the project, including approval of a Planned Unit Development, issuance of an environmental management permit, a proposed CRA development agreement and a proposed development agreement with the City of Tallahassee. Each of these components will require public approval from their respective governing bodies.

    Early 2018 – Construction Activities Begin:

    Details will be provided when available.

    Summer 2019 – Phase I Grand Opening:

    Details will be provided when available.

  • 6. How will the project address the historical buildings on site?

    Three vacant, historic buildings — including the Firestone and Bloxham Annex buildings — currently occupy the property. The project team plans to preserve the Bloxham Annex building – the former Leon County Health Unit – in its entirety. Built by the WPA in 1940, the Health Unit was the first of its kind in the state, where interracial staff provided services for residents, including many residents of the nearby Smokey Hollow neighborhood, one of the city’s most important African American enclaves. In addition to symbolizing a new progressive influence on public health, the building’s architecture reflects the Art Moderne style, a style that is nearly extinct from the fabric of Tallahassee.

    This building’s location on the corner of the site helps make its preservation possible. The same is not true for the second Bloxham building and the Firestone building, which are positioned closer to the middle of the site and will not be incorporated into the new development. After careful evaluation, it has been determined that the location of these two buildings within the site significantly limits the project team’s ability to fulfill the CRA’s vision and request for an economically viable, urban mixed-use destination.

    The development team understands that these structures represent an important piece of Tallahassee’s history and remains committed to honoring that history. NAP has formed a community historical user group to explore the stories behind these buildings and help cast a vision for how to best retell them in a large public plaza that will be created within the new development.

    The user group – comprised of educators, preservationists, civil rights activists and community leaders – can be viewed here.

    NAP and the user group invited the public to share their ideas for how to honor the history of the site within the new public plaza at a Community Ideas Session held on June 15th. During the meeting, citizens provided suggestions for stories they would like to see retold via permanent outdoor memorials, monuments and/or interactive exhibits. Community members who are still interested in submitting ideas for what should go into the proposed plaza can submit their ideas to [email protected] through July 2017.  

    Following a thorough review of all ideas, NAP and the Community Historical User Group will work together to develop the specific criteria for what should be displayed in the public plaza.  

    Building Backgrounds:

    The following offers a brief historical overview of each building on the project site according to local historian, Jonathan Lammers.

    Bloxham Annex (Former Leon County Health Unit)

    • Address: 325 E. Gaines Street
    • Year Built: 1940
    • Historical Significance: Jointly funded by Leon County, the City of Tallahassee and the Works Progress Administration (WPA), this building served as the first permanent home for the Leon County Health Unit, which was the oldest in the state. The Health Unit was staffed by interracial nurses and provided prenatal treatment for pregnant women, childhood vaccinations for smallpox, diphtheria and typhoid, dental examinations and treatment for common ailments such as hookworm. The building’s modern exterior was meant to reflect efficient technical and scientific medical work, and was described The Daily Democrat in July 1940 as “a great monument of progress of Floridians over disease, ill health, poor sanitation, and poverty.”
    • Structural Modifications: The building is a clear and well-preserved example of Streamline Moderne design carried out under the aegis of the Public Works Administration. The building retains excellent exterior integrity. The only notable exterior alteration is the replacement of the original multi-light steel sash casement windows. The interior has been completely remodeled and no longer conveys clear association with its use as a health unit.
    • Future Plans: This building will be preserved in its entirety. Unlike the other two historical buildings on the site, its location does not impede the economic viability of the project as a whole or inhibit the project team from meeting the requests of the CRA.

    Firestone Building (Former Leon County Jail)

    • Address: 409 E. Gaines Street
    • Year Built: 1937
    • Historical Significance: The Leon County Jail is significantly associated with the Civil Rights Movement in Tallahassee. Primarily, this association stems from various Civil Rights protests during the early 1960s, when peaceful African-American demonstrators, including FAMU students, were arrested and held in the jail.
    • Structural Modifications: Since serving as the county jail in the early 1960’s, the Firestone building has undergone extensive remodeling efforts that have significantly eroded its historic integrity. These include the complete removal of interior features, as well as exterior alterations, including the replacement of all windows. A previous application to include the building on the National Register of Historic places was rejected.    
    • Future Plans: This building will not be incorporated into the new development because its location near the center of the site impedes the economic potential of the project and inhibits the development team from meeting the requests of the CRA. Preserving any portion (including the facade) of the building would mean NAP could not build on top of the structure, nor could they build parking underneath it. Therefore, NAP cannot retain this structure and still create an economically viable, urban mixed-use destination as has been requested by the CRA. Further, as stated above, the building has undergone extensive structural modifications that have stripped away its historical integrity. While its physical history is no longer intact, the stories the building represents will be permanently remembered in a public plaza within the new development.

    Bloxham Annex A / DNR Douglas Building (Former WPA District Offices)

    • Address: 319 E. Gaines Street
    • Year Built: 1939
    • Historical Significance: This building was originally constructed as the Works Projects Administration (WPA) District Offices. The WPA was created in 1935 as the largest and most ambitious of the New Deal programs designed to provide jobs and improve infrastructure during the Great Depression. It worked in tandem with similar federal programs, including the Public Works Administration (PWA). In Tallahassee, the WPA or PWA funded numerous civic projects, including the Leon County Jail, Leon High School, the Leon County Health Unit, the Leon County Armory, an addition to the old Florida Capitol and the Dining Hall at Florida State University.
    • Structural Modifications: As with the former Leon County Health Unit, of which it is a semi-twin, the building is a clear and well-preserved example of Streamline Moderne design. The only notable exterior alteration is the replacement of the original windows, and potentially the alteration of a wall at the basement level on the east facade. The interior has been completely remodeled and no longer conveys clear association with its original use.
    • Future Plans: This building will not be incorporated into the new development. Due to its location on the project site, preserving any portion of this structure would impede the economic viability of the project as a whole and inhibit the project team from meeting the requests of the CRA. The stories associated with the entire site will be permanently remembered in a public plaza within the new development.

    For more background on the histories of the buildings, view a historical report here.

    You can view photos of a May 5, 2017 Community Historical User Group meeting and tour here.

  • 7. How will the Civil Rights Movement events that occurred at the Old Leon County Jail be commemorated?

    As the site of the nation’s first nonviolent jail-in during the Civil Rights Movement, the property is steeped in historical significance. Prominent Civil Rights leader Patricia Stephens Due and other activists were held at the jail formerly housed in the Firestone Building for a time following their involvement at the Woolworth sit-ins. It was during her incarceration that Due penned the famous “Letter from a Leon County Jail” that inspired a personal response from Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. As a part of the RFP process, NAP sought input from individuals intimately familiar with the history of the property. Moving forward, the project team will collaborate with local government and the community to cast the vision for a Civil Rights Memorial housed in a public plaza that will commemorate the bravery of Patricia Stephens Due and other activists at the jail in 1960 and educate Tallahassee residents and visitors of their importance.

    The Community Historical User Group and NAP collected broader community input during a Community Listening Session held on June 15. Attendees discussed ideas for a public plaza that will highlight the Civil Rights events that took place in the area, among other memorable historical events and milestones.  Community members who are still interested in submitting ideas for what should go into the proposed plaza can submit their ideas to [email protected] through July 2017.

  • 8. Will the landmark live oak tree on the northeast corner of the site be preserved? 
    Yes. NAP is committed to preserving the large live oak tree on the northeast corner of the property as required by the CRA. The development team is working closely with an arborist to create a protection plan that ensures the tree will be fully protected during construction.
  • 9. What kind of housing will be offered at the new development?

    The residential component of the project will seek to attract a broad range of people who desire to live year-round in quality, modern housing at the heart of Tallahassee’s newest hub of entertainment, arts and culture. Housing options will likely include market rate apartments for rent and flats or townhouses for purchase – both offering stellar views of either the park or downtown.

  • 10. How do we know these residences won’t end up vacant for most of the year, like many other residential buildings downtown?

    NAP holds extensive experience developing successful mixed-use projects on public parks and fully understands the symbiotic relationship that must exist between the park and the development, with each spurring activity in the other. The goal of this project is to breathe life into Cascades Park and the downtown area, making them hubs of economic activity, growth and overall vitality. NAP is committed to working with the City of Tallahassee to increase the number and types of events held at the park and at the new development. NAP is also considering strategies to limit seasonal residents.

  • 11. What type of businesses will be located there?

    Further supporting the 18-hour enjoyment of the downtown area, options like a boutique hotel, wellness center, retail shops, restaurants and office space are being explored.

    According to the preliminary site plan, these entities will be clustered around “Festival Street,” which will serve as the focal point of the development. Specific strategies such as food truck vendor support, pop-up retail and family-friendly recreation and play spaces will encourage greater activation and enjoyment of Cascades Park.

    It is important for community and government stakeholders to understand that all ideas, schematics and site plans that have been produced so far are still speculative, and no final determination has been made regarding any aspect of the proposed development. As of March 2017, NAP began investing in site inspections, environmental assessments, market research and other related studies to determine what is economically and logistically feasible to build, and appropriate for the market. As NAP movies through this process, representatives will continue to meet with and gather input from local government and other stakeholders before bringing an updated site plan before the CRA board.

  • 12. Will the new development contain arts and cultural components?

    In addition to the hospitality and retail opportunities available, the development will honor Tallahassee’s commitment to the arts by expanding the entertainment and cultural functions of Cascades Park through a designated amphitheater support space. Discussions with local government regarding this space are currently underway.

    If you represent a local arts organization and have questions or ideas about how your organization might be involved with this development, please contact the Tallahassee Community Redevelopment Agency at 850-891-8357.

  • 13. Where will people park once the development is completed?

    The current site plan calls for two partially underground parking garages, one with two full floors designated for public parking, with the other floors designated to support the residential, hotel and commercial areas. The garages will be mostly concealed by the exterior of the development, with little visibility from the streets, which will enhance the aesthetic of the overall project. Street level parking spots will also be available.

  • 14. How will the development reflect the character of Tallahassee and the surrounding communities?

    NAP will collaborate with local government through a public process in the coming months to determine the firm and final vision for the project. In general, the development team will refer to the Gaines Street Urban Design Guidelines established by the City of Tallahassee to guide the architectural aspect of the development.

  • 15. Will the public have an opportunity to provide input on the final vision for the project?

    Yes, in accordance with the government-led public process that will ensue in the coming months. Interested residents are encouraged to attend public meetings as they are scheduled.

  • 16. Will the area be safe for pedestrians and bicyclists?

    The development will improve the walkability of the area with pedestrian friendly pathways and support for multi-modal transportation that will connect the development to downtown. Bicyclists will enjoy connection to Tallahassee’s extensive bicycle paths. Additionally, residents will have the opportunity to walk or ride their bikes to work at downtown offices.

  • 17. How was the developer selected?

    The Tallahassee Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA) issued a Request for Proposals (RFP) for the sale and redevelopment of the Firestone and Bloxham Annex properties in February 2016. After receiving no responses, the CRA re-issued the RFP in August 2016. North American Properties was the only respondent to the second RFP and was invited to present their proposal to the RFP selection committee for evaluation in December 2016, and eventually to the CRA Board for a vote in January 2017.

  • 18. Who is North American Properties?

    Founded in 1954, North American Properties (NAP) is a privately-held, multi-regional real estate operating company that has acquired, developed and managed retail, multifamily, mixed-use and office properties across the U.S. The company also holds extensive experience developing successful mixed-use projects surrounding public parks, including the Historic Fourth Ward Park in Atlanta and Centennial Park in Nashville.
    Locally, NAP has invested more than $150 million in large-scale, mixed-use developments in Tallahassee since 2013, specifically in the Gaines Street District. These projects have collectively created more than 800 construction jobs and nearly 200 permanent ongoing jobs, with a total annual economic impact of more than $17 million. Most recently, the company relocated Tallahassee-based J.H. Dowling Construction Materials from their office on Madison Street to a more efficient facility on Jackson Bluff Road through adaptive reuse of two vacant buildings. The relocation enabled the 70-year-old, family-owned company to remain in business and expand its local presence.

    For more information about NAP, visit www.naproperties.com.